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This Mavic Aero wheel/tire combo:

I mean, just look how perfectly that tire transitions to that rim. This is called the CX-01 removable blade and it looks absolute perfection. This is a great example of using whiz engineering to solve issues people consider unsolvable at first glance, such as that bit of transition from tire to rim that is not quite perfectly smooth.

 

This adjustable stem:

IMG_20170305_142916Believe it or not, I can think of a whole lot of reasons why I would want a stem to be adjustable. On the track, switching from a 60 lap scratch race to a kieran and want to get lower? Adjust the stem. Have a kid who is growing quickly, adjust her stem. Want to try out some different positions without constantly moving spacers or tweaking adjustments, simply adjust the stem. Sure, there’s some weight penalty here, but a whole ton of convenience.

This forgiving seatpost:

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To be uncomfortable, road vibrations need to travel either to your hands, feat, or seat. Having a split seatpost allows for more compliance, which should lead to increased comfort. But it also just looks really great on a custom, pink bike.

This integrated headlight:

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I have a soft-spot for commuters that go the extra mile in considering the realities of bike commuting. Let’s be honest, I’ve lost a lot of lights along the way off my Rocky Mountain Metropolis. Integrating the headlight into the frame is an awesome way to make sure you always have a light with you and it won’t go missing when you lock up the bike.

This wooden handlebar:

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Ok, so wooden handlebars are nothing new. Lots of funky fixies are integrating wood throughout the bike, including things like bamboo frames. However, what I noticed was this handlebar was cut to make it more comfortable to hold. These little touches are what take a bike from looking a bit of a bodge to being beautiful and unique.

This titanium handiwork:

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Although I’ve never quite understood the allure of the titanium bicycle (seems like an expensive way to make something heavier than carbon), the craftsmanship that goes into some of these custom titanium bikes is quite unbelievable. Look at the work around the dropout. The hours of measuring and cutting required just to create this one small part of the bike in a way that is both functional and beautiful is absolutely inspiring. Although titanium bikes might not be my dream, I’m still glad someone is making them, and making them this well.